codekasten/WdpF/Yes-Men-Uebersetzung/de.srt

5973 lines
104 KiB
Plaintext
Raw Blame History

1
00:00:33,380 --> 00:00:35,371
Jeez, this is terrible.
2
00:00:35,449 --> 00:00:37,508
It's the stupidest.
I can't --
3
00:00:39,052 --> 00:00:41,987
It's an hour's difference.
The time zone is different here.
4
00:00:42,989 --> 00:00:46,584
Fuck. It's unbelievable.
How the fuck can that happen?
5
00:00:46,660 --> 00:00:48,150
Okay. Here.
6
00:00:48,228 --> 00:00:50,492
Okay, there. That's done.
Now what?
7
00:00:50,564 --> 00:00:51,895
Okay. Got it. Okay.
8
00:00:51,965 --> 00:00:53,455
Pull it up.
9
00:00:53,533 --> 00:00:55,967
Okay, now let's get your...
10
00:01:03,710 --> 00:01:07,373
A few years ago, we wanted to...
11
00:01:07,447 --> 00:01:11,042
try to help out with some activist's
anti-corporate activities.
12
00:01:11,118 --> 00:01:14,281
And we heard about this website
called rtmark.com.
13
00:01:14,354 --> 00:01:16,584
And we went there, and they --
14
00:01:16,656 --> 00:01:19,489
they handed us a domain name --
gwbush.com --
15
00:01:19,559 --> 00:01:21,686
and asked us if we might like
to make a website
16
00:01:21,762 --> 00:01:23,821
that was critical of George Bush.
17
00:01:23,897 --> 00:01:27,628
Because George Bush's real
domain name was georgewbush.com.
18
00:01:27,701 --> 00:01:31,296
And this was 1999,
so it was just during the campaign
19
00:01:31,371 --> 00:01:33,498
when he was beginning
to run for president.
20
00:01:33,573 --> 00:01:36,167
And we didn't really know
quite what to do,
21
00:01:36,243 --> 00:01:38,575
so we went to Bush's website
and looked at it.
22
00:01:38,645 --> 00:01:41,375
And it turned out to be full
of strange hypocrisies, like,
23
00:01:41,448 --> 00:01:44,508
for example, he called himself
"The environmental governor of Texas,"
24
00:01:44,584 --> 00:01:47,678
but we looked a little closer
at his record and found out
25
00:01:47,754 --> 00:01:51,212
that he had actually created
the most polluted state in the country
26
00:01:51,291 --> 00:01:54,089
because he dismantled
the Clean Air Laws while he was there.
27
00:01:54,161 --> 00:01:56,891
And, actually, that's, I guess,
what he's doing now nationally.
28
00:01:56,963 --> 00:01:59,158
So we thought,
"Well, this kind of hypocrisy
29
00:01:59,232 --> 00:02:02,395
we can easily poke fun at
by making a satire website."
30
00:02:02,469 --> 00:02:05,199
And we made this satire website
that looked exactly like Bush's
31
00:02:05,272 --> 00:02:07,604
except for a few key differences.
32
00:02:07,674 --> 00:02:10,165
Like there was a photo on the banner --
33
00:02:10,243 --> 00:02:14,976
instead of him and his wife
in front of the capitol building in Texas,
34
00:02:15,048 --> 00:02:17,915
we showed him pointing the finger
at black people.
35
00:02:17,984 --> 00:02:21,579
And this seemed to get him
a little bit angry.
36
00:02:21,655 --> 00:02:23,589
So the Bush campaign
tried to shut us down
37
00:02:23,657 --> 00:02:25,648
by sending us
a cease and desist letter
38
00:02:25,725 --> 00:02:28,125
and by complaining
to the Federal Election Commission.
39
00:02:28,195 --> 00:02:30,459
But we were able
to just take those threats
40
00:02:30,530 --> 00:02:32,964
and send them to the media.
41
00:02:33,033 --> 00:02:35,092
And immediately the <i>New York Times</i>
wrote an article,
42
00:02:35,168 --> 00:02:37,102
and there were a whole bunch
of other articles.
43
00:02:37,170 --> 00:02:39,832
In fact, one reporter
read these articles and,
44
00:02:39,906 --> 00:02:42,238
at a press conference,
asked Bush,
45
00:02:42,309 --> 00:02:45,904
"So, what about this website --
gwbush.com -- what do you think of that?"
46
00:03:10,937 --> 00:03:12,268
So it was all over the place.
47
00:03:12,339 --> 00:03:13,931
A lot of people read about it,
48
00:03:14,007 --> 00:03:18,000
including a guy who had another
domain name called gatt.org.
49
00:03:18,078 --> 00:03:21,241
And, of course, GATT is the
Global Agreement on Tariffs and Trade,
50
00:03:21,314 --> 00:03:24,477
and it's the predecessor agreement
to the World Trade Organization.
51
00:03:24,551 --> 00:03:26,951
And he said,
"If you could do this for Bush,
52
00:03:27,020 --> 00:03:29,955
then maybe you can
also do this for the WTO."
53
00:03:32,259 --> 00:03:36,491
The WTO is supposed to be
sort of a United Nations of commerce,
54
00:03:36,563 --> 00:03:40,727
a conglomeration
of all these countries in the world...
55
00:03:40,800 --> 00:03:44,395
that get together every now and then
to discuss trade policies
56
00:03:44,471 --> 00:03:50,239
in how exactly goods will be bought
and sold throughout the world.
57
00:03:50,310 --> 00:03:54,076
I'm sure, originally,
the stated purpose of the WTO
58
00:03:54,147 --> 00:03:57,878
was to help these countries
who are developing
59
00:03:57,951 --> 00:04:02,479
so that, you know, the world community
can help raise them out of poverty.
60
00:04:02,556 --> 00:04:05,787
In fact, what it's done is
it's allowed large corporations
61
00:04:05,859 --> 00:04:09,351
to go in and exploit these people
even further
62
00:04:09,429 --> 00:04:12,296
so that Americans
become even wealthier
63
00:04:12,365 --> 00:04:16,699
and the people in these countries
continue to struggle to get by.
64
00:04:16,770 --> 00:04:22,402
And I think that's --
at this point it's upset quite a few people.
65
00:04:37,557 --> 00:04:40,458
So I gotta try
and remember where Sal lives.
66
00:04:40,527 --> 00:04:45,362
It's a little bit complicated. There's, like,
this snaking road up over the hills.
67
00:04:45,432 --> 00:04:47,263
And who is Sal?
68
00:04:47,334 --> 00:04:51,202
Sal is a friend who I met in San Diego,
69
00:04:51,271 --> 00:04:55,002
and he moved to L.A.
to work in the movie industry,
70
00:04:55,075 --> 00:04:59,239
and that's why now he does,
actually, costuming professionally.
71
00:04:59,312 --> 00:05:01,473
He builds, like, weird suits
72
00:05:01,548 --> 00:05:04,813
out of pretty much
any material you can imagine.
73
00:05:04,884 --> 00:05:08,183
And so, when we needed a costume,
I knew who to call.
74
00:05:18,798 --> 00:05:20,129
Yeah, this is it. Yeah.
75
00:05:22,435 --> 00:05:26,838
I'll maybe bring him his mail, actually,
as long as we're at it here.
76
00:05:27,641 --> 00:05:29,268
- Yeah -- I don't like it.
- Okay.
77
00:05:29,342 --> 00:05:34,245
It looks too much like sex stuff
instead of -- it's not very modern-looking.
78
00:05:34,314 --> 00:05:37,715
Remember, this is the future.
This isn't about, like, straps and stuff.
79
00:05:37,784 --> 00:05:40,150
That's like dungeons and torture
in the past.
80
00:05:40,220 --> 00:05:43,553
The costume
is a manager's leisure suit.
81
00:05:43,623 --> 00:05:46,285
And the idea is that Hank Hardy Unruh,
82
00:05:46,359 --> 00:05:48,919
the representative
from the World Trade Organization,
83
00:05:48,995 --> 00:05:52,897
is going to go and wear
this breakaway business suit
84
00:05:52,966 --> 00:05:54,456
that's gonna be pulled off of him
85
00:05:54,534 --> 00:05:57,128
during the middle
of the keynote address to the conference.
86
00:05:57,203 --> 00:06:01,435
And then a big inflatable phallus
is going to emerge from this golden suit,
87
00:06:01,508 --> 00:06:03,442
and on the end of it is a TV screen
88
00:06:03,510 --> 00:06:06,775
that he uses
to manage sweatshops remotely.
89
00:06:08,048 --> 00:06:10,107
The reason we got invited
to these things
90
00:06:10,183 --> 00:06:12,413
is we have a website
called gatt.org.
91
00:06:12,485 --> 00:06:16,285
The gatt.org website looks a lot
like the WTO website,
92
00:06:16,356 --> 00:06:19,519
but it is critical of the WTO.
93
00:06:19,592 --> 00:06:21,753
Most people, though,
who find gatt.org
94
00:06:21,828 --> 00:06:25,320
by searching
for the World Trade Organization...
95
00:06:25,398 --> 00:06:28,890
will go without reading it
and will send us e-mail directly.
96
00:06:28,968 --> 00:06:32,768
So a lot of people ask us
weird questions about tariffs and trade,
97
00:06:32,839 --> 00:06:35,239
and we try to answer
as accurately as we can.
98
00:06:35,308 --> 00:06:37,367
And occasionally invitations come in
99
00:06:37,444 --> 00:06:41,175
from official
or quasi-official organizations
100
00:06:41,247 --> 00:06:44,648
asking for opinions
or asking us to attend a conference.
101
00:06:44,718 --> 00:06:48,381
And so, when they ask, they really think
they're talking to the WTO,
102
00:06:48,455 --> 00:06:52,516
and we respond by giving them
what we think they want --
103
00:06:52,592 --> 00:06:54,992
which is the opinions of the WTO --
104
00:06:55,061 --> 00:06:57,222
as accurately
as we can represent them.
105
00:06:57,297 --> 00:06:59,959
You know what I'm thinking,
actually, looking at this...
106
00:07:00,633 --> 00:07:03,227
is that maybe this is a zipper.
107
00:07:03,303 --> 00:07:04,361
Yeah! Yeah, yeah.
108
00:07:04,437 --> 00:07:07,167
Then he just unzips it
and pulls the thing at the same time.
109
00:07:07,240 --> 00:07:09,105
- That could be really good.
- Because...
110
00:07:09,175 --> 00:07:13,168
to have it burst out of the Velcro,
it might not be strong enough to burst out,
111
00:07:13,246 --> 00:07:14,941
and then he'd have to pull it.
112
00:07:15,348 --> 00:07:17,213
Part of the thing
that gives us the courage
113
00:07:17,283 --> 00:07:23,347
to go to Tampere...
with this really absurd suit
114
00:07:23,423 --> 00:07:26,415
is that we already went
to Salzburg, Austria, to represent
115
00:07:26,493 --> 00:07:30,486
the World Trade Organization
at a conference on tariffs and trade.
116
00:07:30,563 --> 00:07:35,762
There, our representative -- the same guy
who is Hank Hardy Unruh here --
117
00:07:35,835 --> 00:07:38,770
was Dr. Andreas Bichlbauer there.
118
00:07:38,838 --> 00:07:40,772
And he gave a lecture that focused
119
00:07:40,840 --> 00:07:45,675
on basically doing away with
all customs in the name of free trade,
120
00:07:45,745 --> 00:07:49,306
like getting rid of the <i>siesta</i>
in Spain and Italy
121
00:07:49,382 --> 00:07:52,112
so that business hours
could be the same.
122
00:07:52,185 --> 00:07:55,313
In Italy, on the other hand,
you have a totally different situation,
123
00:07:55,388 --> 00:08:01,054
in which sleep is...done during
the day as much as at night almost.
124
00:08:01,127 --> 00:08:05,860
And allowing people to sell their votes
over the Internet to the highest bidder
125
00:08:05,932 --> 00:08:10,665
so that the barriers to free trade
and things like votes were out of the way.
126
00:08:10,737 --> 00:08:14,673
One possible solution is being tested
in the field of American politics
127
00:08:14,741 --> 00:08:19,508
to streamline the grotesquely
inefficient system of elections.
128
00:08:19,579 --> 00:08:24,573
Vote-auction.com, in turn,
employs only four people
129
00:08:24,651 --> 00:08:27,085
to transmit not merely information,
130
00:08:27,153 --> 00:08:30,782
but actual money
directly to the consuming voter.
131
00:08:30,857 --> 00:08:37,854
It's a -- a forum for people voluntarily
to offer their vote to the highest bidder.
132
00:08:37,931 --> 00:08:39,865
And despite giving what we thought
133
00:08:39,933 --> 00:08:43,266
was a lecture that would immediately
get us booed off stage
134
00:08:43,336 --> 00:08:46,169
or get Bichlbauer
maybe even thrown in jail
135
00:08:46,239 --> 00:08:48,639
because people would figure out
he was an impostor,
136
00:08:48,708 --> 00:08:50,300
the exact opposite happened.
137
00:08:50,376 --> 00:08:52,037
Everybody was super polite.
138
00:08:52,111 --> 00:08:57,242
It didn't seem like everybody even noticed
that what he said was so absurd.
139
00:09:18,938 --> 00:09:20,269
Well, so far...
140
00:09:21,708 --> 00:09:24,700
...we thought Bichlbauer
would be very extreme
141
00:09:24,777 --> 00:09:27,769
and people would react to it
and we'd get shut down,
142
00:09:27,847 --> 00:09:30,247
and nothing of the sort happened.
143
00:09:30,316 --> 00:09:34,650
So...this time we just have to really
push it and make it totally extreme.
144
00:09:34,721 --> 00:09:37,053
I mean, we keep trying
to push things further
145
00:09:37,123 --> 00:09:43,062
to try to really clarify the positions
of the WTO to make them very legible.
146
00:09:43,129 --> 00:09:45,597
It's one back,
but this -- this is good.
147
00:09:55,308 --> 00:09:56,798
<i>Andy.</i>
148
00:09:59,045 --> 00:10:00,535
It has a terrible siren.
149
00:10:06,119 --> 00:10:08,110
I have to check the Web
when we get upstairs.
150
00:10:08,187 --> 00:10:10,121
Oh, my God. What are we
gonna do about this --
151
00:10:10,189 --> 00:10:12,623
we gotta watch the Patrick video.
152
00:10:13,693 --> 00:10:15,524
It's weird stuff, isn't it?
153
00:10:16,863 --> 00:10:18,524
That's one way of putting it.
154
00:10:18,598 --> 00:10:20,259
It's really a problem.
155
00:10:20,333 --> 00:10:24,599
It seems about the weirdest
I've seen from him ever, I think.
156
00:10:27,040 --> 00:10:28,871
It looks pretty good on this.
157
00:10:29,776 --> 00:10:31,038
Yeah, it's all right.
158
00:10:35,048 --> 00:10:39,109
What we have here is that we have
our cyber Andy here
159
00:10:39,185 --> 00:10:42,120
who's going to be wearing the suit.
160
00:10:42,188 --> 00:10:45,783
And I'm going to be showing
all the different ways
161
00:10:45,858 --> 00:10:50,693
in which the Management Leisure Suit
can be useful in industry today
162
00:10:50,763 --> 00:10:54,927
and maximize leisure potential.
163
00:10:56,369 --> 00:10:59,634
Sometimes I don't think they know
what the hell to expect out of me.
164
00:11:00,440 --> 00:11:04,103
What I'll come up with...
165
00:11:04,177 --> 00:11:09,240
is frequently not exactly
what they had in mind,
166
00:11:09,315 --> 00:11:12,580
but it's...you know,
167
00:11:12,652 --> 00:11:16,816
it fits in perfectly with what they're --
what they're going to do.
168
00:11:17,623 --> 00:11:19,955
Well, I came out
of a corporate environment
169
00:11:20,026 --> 00:11:25,760
and a company that I really gave,
you know, a good bit of my soul to
170
00:11:25,832 --> 00:11:28,232
over a long period of time progressively.
171
00:11:28,301 --> 00:11:31,429
And there were a lot of downsizings
and, of course,
172
00:11:31,504 --> 00:11:35,099
the company I was with I thought
was gonna take care of me.
173
00:11:35,174 --> 00:11:38,007
And I realized
that the bottom line is the bottom line,
174
00:11:38,077 --> 00:11:42,480
and there really isn't any humanity
in corporate structures,
175
00:11:42,548 --> 00:11:46,882
so therefore I hope that maybe
being part of the Yes Men
176
00:11:46,953 --> 00:11:51,686
might, in some way, help raise issues
about global work issues
177
00:11:51,758 --> 00:11:56,422
and social issues that are being
brought about by globalization, etcetera.
178
00:11:59,098 --> 00:12:01,157
I grew up in the suburbs here,
179
00:12:01,234 --> 00:12:07,537
and then I moved to Troy six years ago
for a job at the university.
180
00:12:07,607 --> 00:12:11,976
There's a place there called Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute, and I teach there.
181
00:12:12,045 --> 00:12:14,377
I was moving back home, really,
because I'd been away --
182
00:12:14,447 --> 00:12:17,416
I'd been on the West Coast
for about 12 years.
183
00:12:17,483 --> 00:12:18,643
Wait, what is this?
184
00:12:18,718 --> 00:12:21,050
This is -- it's this...
185
00:12:21,120 --> 00:12:25,022
...SimCopter hack.
Here it is.
186
00:12:25,091 --> 00:12:27,889
I wanted to watch this tape
'cause this is the tape --
187
00:12:27,960 --> 00:12:31,726
I've been cleaning out the archives,
and I found this tape in there.
188
00:12:31,798 --> 00:12:34,892
I met Andy through a friend, actually.
A mutual friend.
189
00:12:34,967 --> 00:12:38,130
Actually, two people
that we both knew
190
00:12:38,204 --> 00:12:41,173
suggested that me and Andy
get in contact with one another
191
00:12:41,240 --> 00:12:43,572
because we'd both
done similar projects.
192
00:12:43,643 --> 00:12:47,977
One of the jobs that I had was
at this games company called Maxis
193
00:12:48,047 --> 00:12:49,776
that makes SimCity.
194
00:12:49,849 --> 00:12:54,513
One of the games they were making
at the time was SimCopter.
195
00:12:54,587 --> 00:12:57,420
I was in charge of the little people
that run around in the game.
196
00:12:57,490 --> 00:13:00,948
And I made them
wearing nothing but swim trunks.
197
00:13:01,027 --> 00:13:04,428
They'd all be boys, and they'd
be running around kissing each other.
198
00:13:04,497 --> 00:13:08,092
So all the people who ordered
this very popular video game
199
00:13:08,167 --> 00:13:12,331
suddenly were treated
to a completely different spectacle.
200
00:13:12,405 --> 00:13:14,600
So he got a lot
of press attention for it,
201
00:13:14,674 --> 00:13:18,166
and it was seen as a kind of --
an activist kind of statement
202
00:13:18,244 --> 00:13:21,680
about video games and the sort
of macho nature of them.
203
00:13:21,747 --> 00:13:23,681
It all involves
the unexpected appearance
204
00:13:23,749 --> 00:13:27,150
of some gay, kissing muscle men
every Friday the 13th.
205
00:13:27,220 --> 00:13:30,053
He's becoming a celebrity of sorts
in the computer world --
206
00:13:30,123 --> 00:13:32,182
especially the gay computer world.
207
00:13:32,258 --> 00:13:35,523
And then I had done a project
using Barbie dolls,
208
00:13:35,595 --> 00:13:39,031
where we switched the voice boxes
of Barbie dolls and G.I. Joes.
209
00:13:39,098 --> 00:13:43,262
<i>Troops! Attack that Cobra jet</i>
<i>with heavy firepower!</i>
210
00:13:44,504 --> 00:13:48,998
And that ended up in G.I. Joes that
said things like, "I love to shop with you,"
211
00:13:49,075 --> 00:13:53,068
and Barbie dolls that said things like,
"Dead men tell no lies."
212
00:13:53,146 --> 00:13:56,240
And we got them back
on store shelves
213
00:13:56,315 --> 00:14:00,183
all over the country in what we called
our "Shop Giving Program."
214
00:14:00,253 --> 00:14:02,084
We're like Santa Claus,
only less radical,
215
00:14:02,155 --> 00:14:04,715
because Santa Claus
breaks into people's houses. We don't.
216
00:14:04,790 --> 00:14:07,156
So that when kids
got them at Christmas,
217
00:14:07,226 --> 00:14:08,955
they were surprised to find their doll
218
00:14:09,028 --> 00:14:11,360
saying something other
than what they expected.
219
00:14:11,430 --> 00:14:15,423
And the kids thought it was hilarious.
They loved having these crazy dolls.
220
00:14:15,501 --> 00:14:16,991
We sent out press releases,
221
00:14:17,069 --> 00:14:21,130
so it was in the news on Christmas Day
and for the week following.
222
00:14:21,207 --> 00:14:26,008
It just went through every kind
of media channel imaginable.
223
00:14:26,078 --> 00:14:28,842
<i>- The B.L.O...</i>
<i>- The Mission of the B.L.O...</i>
224
00:14:28,915 --> 00:14:32,146
<i>The Barbie Liberation Organization --</i>
<i>the B.L.O...</i>
225
00:14:32,218 --> 00:14:36,814
<i>It was real funny 'cause it looks</i>
<i>like, "Come on, fight me. Fight me!"</i>
226
00:14:36,889 --> 00:14:39,619
<i>- Except it says...</i>
<i>- I love school. Don't you?</i>
227
00:14:39,692 --> 00:14:41,023
<i>Let's sing with the band tonight!</i>
228
00:14:41,093 --> 00:14:42,754
Now we're -- with the Yes Men,
229
00:14:42,828 --> 00:14:46,559
we're calling that sort of basic idea
"Identity Correction,"
230
00:14:46,632 --> 00:14:48,361
like saying, these things --
231
00:14:48,434 --> 00:14:51,699
these things that are not
really presenting themselves honestly
232
00:14:51,771 --> 00:14:55,434
or that hide something about their nature
that's really scary,
233
00:14:55,508 --> 00:14:56,839
we want to bring that out.
234
00:14:56,909 --> 00:14:59,241
We want to show that.
We want to demonstrate that.
235
00:14:59,312 --> 00:15:02,145
And so, like for the WTO --
236
00:15:02,215 --> 00:15:04,046
we think that the WTO
237
00:15:04,116 --> 00:15:06,778
is doing all these terrible things
that are hurting people
238
00:15:06,852 --> 00:15:08,843
and they're saying the exact opposite.
239
00:15:08,921 --> 00:15:11,913
And so we're interested
in correcting their identity.
240
00:15:11,991 --> 00:15:15,483
In the same way that an identity thief
steals somebody's identity
241
00:15:15,561 --> 00:15:19,395
in order to basically
just engage in criminal practices,
242
00:15:19,465 --> 00:15:21,797
we target people
we see as criminals,
243
00:15:21,867 --> 00:15:24,461
and we steal their identity
to try to make them honest
244
00:15:24,537 --> 00:15:26,801
or to try to present
a more honest face.
245
00:15:26,872 --> 00:15:29,864
And so...you know,
I guess this whole thing
246
00:15:29,942 --> 00:15:32,433
has its roots for both me and Andy
247
00:15:32,511 --> 00:15:34,843
in stuff that we've been doing
for a long time,
248
00:15:34,914 --> 00:15:38,577
which is trying to create public spectacles
that, in some kind of poetic way,
249
00:15:38,651 --> 00:15:43,179
reveal something about our culture
that's profoundly a problem.
250
00:15:58,371 --> 00:15:59,736
That must be Sal.
251
00:16:01,674 --> 00:16:04,006
- Oh, dude.
- Are you okay?
252
00:16:04,076 --> 00:16:06,067
I got fuckin' lost on that...
253
00:16:06,145 --> 00:16:07,476
Oh, no.
254
00:16:09,515 --> 00:16:11,005
It's been a long day.
255
00:16:11,083 --> 00:16:12,482
Holy shit!
256
00:16:13,786 --> 00:16:18,723
Well, I probably started it
in June or July.
257
00:16:19,358 --> 00:16:23,124
So, on and off
for a good two to three months.
258
00:16:23,195 --> 00:16:27,131
Just a couple more pieces
of Velcro, and that'll really be it.
259
00:16:27,199 --> 00:16:30,691
And, yeah, we're...
at the end of the line.
260
00:16:33,606 --> 00:16:35,767
Okay, look.
So we're making a list here.
261
00:16:35,841 --> 00:16:38,571
Wednesday we leave
for Finland early,
262
00:16:38,644 --> 00:16:41,511
so, Sunday...
263
00:16:41,580 --> 00:16:42,911
make lecture.
264
00:16:42,982 --> 00:16:44,916
Bigger?
Oh, no. That's a big one.
265
00:16:44,984 --> 00:16:51,150
PowerPoint...
and then speech.
266
00:16:51,223 --> 00:16:52,281
Finish.
267
00:17:04,403 --> 00:17:11,070
It's 4:03 a.m., and I guess
I'll just keep working until morning.
268
00:17:11,143 --> 00:17:13,475
I feel...somewhat awake.
269
00:17:13,546 --> 00:17:16,538
And then Andy can take over again.
270
00:17:17,983 --> 00:17:21,475
We can do
around-the-clock shifts, I guess.
271
00:17:23,255 --> 00:17:28,090
I'm just trying to add a few slides
into the PowerPoint here.
272
00:17:29,195 --> 00:17:34,690
Because, actually, a lot of the things
that business leaders of the world
273
00:17:34,767 --> 00:17:39,170
say in relation to these issues
are actually sort of very similar
274
00:17:39,238 --> 00:17:40,899
to what Unruh Hank Hardy says,
275
00:17:40,973 --> 00:17:44,875
even though maybe Unruh Hank Hardy
is a little bit more frank about it.
276
00:17:44,944 --> 00:17:47,970
And, in fact,
when he talked to CNBC,
277
00:17:48,047 --> 00:17:49,378
when he was debating,
278
00:17:49,448 --> 00:17:52,440
an activist, Barry Coates,
just sort of agreed with what he said
279
00:17:52,518 --> 00:17:56,352
when he said that this is what
the WTO does, and this is our position.
280
00:17:56,422 --> 00:18:01,086
And Barry Coates said,
"Well, that's funny. That's exactly right."
281
00:18:01,160 --> 00:18:09,090
So...after Salzburg, we got an e-mail
asking a representative of the WTO
282
00:18:09,168 --> 00:18:12,228
to appear on CNBC
MarketWrap Europe.
283
00:18:12,304 --> 00:18:18,971
And the producer apparently didn't notice
that gatt.org was not the WTO site.
284
00:18:19,044 --> 00:18:25,347
And Granwyth Hulatberi, which is
another name that Andy just came up with,
285
00:18:25,418 --> 00:18:28,012
responded and, of course, said,
286
00:18:28,087 --> 00:18:31,579
"Well, I'd be happy to go
on CNBC MarketWrap."
287
00:18:31,657 --> 00:18:37,493
And the producer wanted him to debate
an anti-globalization protester.
288
00:18:37,563 --> 00:18:43,661
If the WTO is serious about addressing
the issues of world poverty,
289
00:18:43,736 --> 00:18:47,228
it would do things
completely differently than it is now.
290
00:18:47,306 --> 00:18:50,901
Let me bring in Granwyth on that.
Is that a fair point?
291
00:18:52,077 --> 00:18:56,480
Well, of course it is, but I think Barry,
as well as all the other protesters,
292
00:18:56,549 --> 00:19:01,646
are simply, in a word, focused too much
on reality and on facts and figures.
293
00:19:01,720 --> 00:19:05,212
And I think I would have to say
that this is a long-term problem
294
00:19:05,291 --> 00:19:07,782
that comes down
to a problem of education.
295
00:19:07,860 --> 00:19:12,354
We have to find a way to convince
perhaps not the protesters
296
00:19:12,431 --> 00:19:14,262
but the protesters' children
297
00:19:14,333 --> 00:19:20,067
to follow thinkers like Milton Friedman
and Darwin and -- and so on,
298
00:19:20,139 --> 00:19:23,074
rather than what the protesters
have been reared on --
299
00:19:23,142 --> 00:19:26,202
Trotsky and Robespierre
and Abbie Hoffman.
300
00:19:26,278 --> 00:19:30,271
Und ich glaube, dass das
Legen der Inhalte von Erziehung,
301
00:19:30,349 --> 00:19:33,079
ein Legen in private H<>nde -
302
00:19:33,152 --> 00:19:36,246
eine Konzentrierung der Ressourcen
im privaten Sektor -
303
00:19:36,322 --> 00:19:38,483
wird automatisch zu diesem Ergebnis
f<EFBFBD>hren,
304
00:19:38,557 --> 00:19:41,048
und wir werden die Kinder der
Protestierer erzogen sehen
305
00:19:41,126 --> 00:19:43,617
mit v<>llig anderen Sorgen.
306
00:19:43,696 --> 00:19:45,357
Lassen Sie mich darauf
antworten, Barry.
307
00:19:45,431 --> 00:19:47,092
Ich - ich m<>chte nur sagen,
308
00:19:47,166 --> 00:19:49,361
dass diese vereinfachende Argumentation
309
00:19:49,435 --> 00:19:53,098
wirklich, also, zu beleidigend und un-
glaubw<EFBFBD>rdig f<>r die meisten Menschen ist.
310
00:19:53,172 --> 00:19:56,903
Die Tatsache, dass wir die Wahl haben
zwischen Milton Friedman und Abbie Hoffman
311
00:19:56,976 --> 00:20:00,377
als unsere Quellen f<>r <20>komische Geschichte
und Philosophie..
312
00:20:00,446 --> 00:20:03,438
Es gibt viele, viele Denker
in der Welt -
313
00:20:03,516 --> 00:20:06,007
nur nicht die, die bei der WTO
angestellt sind -
314
00:20:06,085 --> 00:20:09,953
die glauben, dass die Ans<6E>tze der
WTO sehr sch<63>dlich sind
315
00:20:10,022 --> 00:20:12,684
f<EFBFBD>r die Entwicklungsaussichten
der <20>rmsten L<>nder
316
00:20:12,758 --> 00:20:14,419
Lassen Sie mich auf Granwyth
antworten.
317
00:20:15,961 --> 00:20:21,558
Ja. Also ich m<>chte auf Granwyth'
- sorry - auf Barry's Punkt eingehen,
318
00:20:21,634 --> 00:20:23,124
dass es andere Denker gibt.
319
00:20:23,202 --> 00:20:27,468
Nun, wer hat denn wirklich die Macht
in der Welt, wer hat also Recht
320
00:20:27,540 --> 00:20:29,201
mit seiner Weltsicht?
321
00:20:29,275 --> 00:20:31,607
Ich meine, ich denke die Antwort
ist leicht.
322
00:20:31,677 --> 00:20:35,511
Und wenn Sie sich meine Ansichten und
die Ansichten meiner Organisation ansehen,
323
00:20:35,581 --> 00:20:39,244
und die vieler, vieler wichtiger
Entscheider in der Welt -
324
00:20:39,318 --> 00:20:43,311
den m<>chtigen Menschen also - dann stimmen
sie mit dem ein, was ich hier erkl<6B>re.
325
00:20:43,389 --> 00:20:46,881
Und ich denke das ist genug zu dieser
Weltsicht.
326
00:20:46,959 --> 00:20:48,119
Kurz, Barry.
327
00:20:48,193 --> 00:20:49,990
Also, ich meine - was wir hier haben
328
00:20:50,062 --> 00:20:53,657
ist ein Bild der Reichen und M<>chtigen, die
bestimmte Ansichten haben,
329
00:20:53,732 --> 00:20:57,065
die sie dann durch die
Institutionen propagieren
330
00:20:57,136 --> 00:20:58,728
in denen sie eine starke Stimme haben.
331
00:20:58,804 --> 00:21:02,205
Und ich denke das ist exakt das Modell,
das in Frage gestellt wird.
332
00:21:02,274 --> 00:21:07,211
Und zwar von einer sehr grossen,
weiter wachsenden Anzahl
333
00:21:07,279 --> 00:21:09,611
von Menschen, die beunruhigt wegen
dieser Regelungen sind.
334
00:21:09,682 --> 00:21:12,742
Die Menschen auf den Strassen
von Genua und Seattle
335
00:21:12,818 --> 00:21:15,286
sind nicht die gesamte Bewegung.
336
00:21:15,354 --> 00:21:16,946
Sie sind nur die Spitze des
Eisbergs.
337
00:21:17,022 --> 00:21:20,856
Wir haben letztes Jahr in einer Studie
die Entwicklungsl<73>nder angesehen,
338
00:21:20,926 --> 00:21:24,020
und haben herausgefunden, dass inner-
halb eines Jahres in 50 Demonstrationen
339
00:21:24,096 --> 00:21:26,929
<EFBFBD>ber eine Million Mensch aus
Entwicklungsl<EFBFBD>ndern
340
00:21:26,999 --> 00:21:29,661
dabei waren, zu versuchen, die
Regeln zu ver<65>ndern,
341
00:21:29,735 --> 00:21:32,465
die ihnen von der Weltbank und dem
IWF aufgezwungen
342
00:21:32,538 --> 00:21:35,200
und durch die WTO festgelegt
wurden.
343
00:21:35,274 --> 00:21:38,141
Danke. Wir m<>ssen zum Ende kommen. Barry
Coates, danke f<>r ihre Teilnahme.
344
00:21:38,210 --> 00:21:42,044
Danke auch an Granwyth Hulatberi und
Vernon Ellis in New York.
345
00:22:08,807 --> 00:22:10,206
Abschnitt drei?
346
00:22:13,412 --> 00:22:14,572
Naja...
347
00:22:14,647 --> 00:22:17,980
Es ist nicht wirklich ein Kleider-
sack, aber, <20>hm...
348
00:22:19,018 --> 00:22:20,349
...es wird schon gehen.
349
00:22:21,987 --> 00:22:25,150
Ja? Glaubst du das ist sehr
gesch<EFBFBD>ftsm<EFBFBD>ssig?
350
00:22:25,224 --> 00:22:26,885
So richtig offiziell?
351
00:22:26,959 --> 00:22:29,018
Sehr...sehr dickes Geld.
352
00:22:29,094 --> 00:22:32,894
Okay, gut. Genau das brauchen wir.
Ich brauche eine protzige Uhr.
353
00:22:34,033 --> 00:22:38,697
Warst du nerv<72>s, als du nach
Salzburg gefahren bist?
354
00:22:38,771 --> 00:22:41,171
Die Sache ist, dass, selbst mit
dieser Salzburg-Sache,
355
00:22:41,240 --> 00:22:43,970
waren wir so irgendwie...
356
00:22:44,043 --> 00:22:47,843
- wir waren schon sehr nerv<72>s,
aber die ganze Zeit <20>ber -
357
00:22:47,913 --> 00:22:50,575
es wird einem nicht bewusst, bis
man wirklich dort ist.
358
00:22:50,649 --> 00:22:51,775
Stimmt.
359
00:22:51,850 --> 00:22:55,251
Nun, nachdem, was ich von der
Rede gesehen habe
360
00:22:55,320 --> 00:22:58,721
f<EFBFBD>ngt es ganz normal an,
361
00:22:58,791 --> 00:23:01,282
so dass die Leute sich entspannen
k<EFBFBD>nnen -
362
00:23:01,360 --> 00:23:05,524
er kann sich sozusagen langsam
reinarbeiten.
363
00:23:07,266 --> 00:23:09,257
Sohn einer verdammten Hure.
364
00:23:11,170 --> 00:23:12,501
Scheisse.
365
00:23:13,505 --> 00:23:16,633
Ja, hast du einen Lappen? Fuck.
366
00:23:17,276 --> 00:23:21,474
Scheisse. Ich hab einen mit Schuhpoli-
tur drauf, der wird nicht gehen, oder?
367
00:23:24,383 --> 00:23:26,715
- Der Bildschirm hat etwas Farbe abgekriegt?
- Jepp.
368
00:23:34,660 --> 00:23:37,652
- Das h<>rt sich wie ein Rasenm<6E>her an.
- Das ist ein bisschen laut, stimmt.
369
00:23:38,997 --> 00:23:40,328
- Das ist nicht gut.
- Vergiss es.
370
00:23:50,142 --> 00:23:53,305
Guck mal, es macht ein neues Ger<65>usch.
Gut. Gut. Gut. Toll.
371
00:23:53,378 --> 00:23:54,970
- Ist das nicht toll?
- Probiers aus.
372
00:23:55,047 --> 00:23:56,639
Jetzt funktioniert es nicht.
373
00:23:56,715 --> 00:23:58,546
- Oh, H<>r zu! Yeah.
- So muss es sein!
374
00:23:59,451 --> 00:24:00,782
Wir m<>ssen uns beeilen!
375
00:24:13,599 --> 00:24:15,863
Okay, zehn Minuten.
Sie sind beide da.
376
00:24:18,337 --> 00:24:19,827
Hey, Sal.
377
00:24:21,073 --> 00:24:22,131
Danke.
378
00:24:23,976 --> 00:24:25,136
Viel Gl<47>ck.
379
00:24:26,478 --> 00:24:28,309
- Wir werden sehen, wie es l<>uft.
- Danke f<>r alles.
380
00:24:28,380 --> 00:24:30,974
Ja, schlaf gut.
Viel Vergn<67>gen.
381
00:24:31,950 --> 00:24:33,611
- Viel Spass.
- Bis bald.
382
00:24:33,685 --> 00:24:36,210
Zieh in meinen Raum.
Entspann dich.
383
00:24:36,288 --> 00:24:37,448
Okay.
384
00:24:40,325 --> 00:24:43,158
Ist das alles?
Wow. Wie effizient.
385
00:24:43,228 --> 00:24:44,388
Okay.
386
00:24:45,831 --> 00:24:48,664
Effizient.
Ein Paradebeispiel an Effizienz.
387
00:24:51,804 --> 00:24:55,240
Du hast etwas in deinem Gesicht.
Nein, hier.
388
00:24:57,075 --> 00:24:58,133
So ist es besser.
389
00:25:30,576 --> 00:25:32,407
Wir sind letzte Nacht angekommen.
390
00:25:32,477 --> 00:25:34,809
Du musstest ein Nickerchen machen.
Du brauchtest etwas Schlaf.
391
00:25:34,880 --> 00:25:36,211
Ich war einfach fertig, stimmt.
392
00:25:36,281 --> 00:25:40,115
Und ich bin los und hab mir den
Konferenzraum angesehen.
393
00:25:40,185 --> 00:25:43,586
Es gab ein Schild an der T<>r, darauf
stand "Textilien der Zukunft."
394
00:25:43,655 --> 00:25:47,591
Unruh Hank Hardy war der erste
Redner - Hank Hardy Unruh.
395
00:25:47,659 --> 00:25:50,059
Und, weisst du, alles
wirkte irgendwie offiziell.
396
00:25:50,128 --> 00:25:52,790
Die Kaffeetassen waren schon da.
397
00:25:52,865 --> 00:25:54,856
Und ich dachte,
"Das ist toll. Ich bin bereit.
398
00:25:54,933 --> 00:25:57,094
Ich weiss exakt wo das ist.
Wir k<>nnen da hin."
399
00:25:57,169 --> 00:25:59,569
Ich hatte einen Ablauf - Ich habe
einen kleinen Ablaufplan aufgestellt,
400
00:25:59,638 --> 00:26:03,836
Ich hatte Karten des Orts und die
aktuellsten Konferenz-Flyer.
401
00:26:05,210 --> 00:26:07,940
Bin dann wieder hergekommen.
Dann sind wir fr<66>h schlafen gegangen.
402
00:26:08,013 --> 00:26:13,007
Hank hat sofort geschnarcht,
aber ich konnte <20>berhaupt nicht schlafen.
403
00:26:13,085 --> 00:26:14,780
Ich lag nur wach im Bett,
404
00:26:14,853 --> 00:26:18,516
und ab und zu bin ich ins Bad oder hab das
Licht angemacht und etwas gelesen,
405
00:26:18,590 --> 00:26:21,491
denn ich war einfach unf<6E>hig zu
schlafen.
406
00:26:21,560 --> 00:26:24,893
Und irgendwann bin ich dann doch ein-
geschlafen, kurz vor dem Aufwachen.
407
00:26:28,734 --> 00:26:29,894
Toll.
408
00:26:32,671 --> 00:26:35,401
Ich lass meine Brieftasche hier.
409
00:26:38,744 --> 00:26:40,234
Okay, los gehts.
410
00:26:43,849 --> 00:26:45,510
- Warte.
- Es ist 8:00.
411
00:26:45,584 --> 00:26:47,575
Ich denke ich werde sie wirklich
hierlassen.
412
00:26:53,525 --> 00:26:54,924
Kommst du?
413
00:26:59,431 --> 00:27:01,922
Hank, es ist ein bisschen fr<66>h,
um aufzustehen.
414
00:27:02,768 --> 00:27:06,499
- Das geht schon ok so.
- Ich meine, ich dachte wir machen Urlaub.
415
00:27:06,571 --> 00:27:08,232
- Wie Bitte?
- Urlaub.
416
00:27:08,307 --> 00:27:09,706
Ich weiss.
417
00:27:09,775 --> 00:27:12,437
- Ich w<>rde gern Urlaub machen.
- Und sie bringen mich nach Finnland...
418
00:27:17,349 --> 00:27:20,682
Gib mir das Ei.
Ich werde es dir pellen.
419
00:27:20,752 --> 00:27:22,413
Das w<>re nett. Danke.
420
00:27:27,292 --> 00:27:29,783
- Aber wir sind sp<73>t dran.
- Sind wir?
421
00:27:29,861 --> 00:27:35,026
Ein bisschen. Es ist nach 8:00, und ich
wollte eigentlich um 8:00 am Tagungsort ein.
422
00:27:35,100 --> 00:27:36,761
- Okay.
- Das klappt schon.
423
00:27:36,835 --> 00:27:38,996
- Ist es nach 8:00?
- Es ist nach 8:00.
424
00:27:39,071 --> 00:27:40,231
Ja.
425
00:27:42,808 --> 00:27:44,969
Weisst du, tu so, als ob...
426
00:27:54,119 --> 00:27:56,383
Toll, wir sind p<>nktlich.
427
00:27:56,455 --> 00:27:57,615
Oh, gut.
428
00:28:00,192 --> 00:28:03,025
Hallo, Ich bin Hank Hardy Unruh.
Ich bin von der -
429
00:28:03,095 --> 00:28:05,495
- Oh, Klar. Freut mich, Sie kennenzulernen.
- Freut mich, Sie kennenzulernen.
430
00:28:05,564 --> 00:28:07,725
- Wir haben sie schon erwartet.
- Oh, gut.
431
00:28:08,834 --> 00:28:11,428
Es ist nicht 9:30 - nein.
Es ist 8:30, oder?
432
00:28:12,237 --> 00:28:16,071
- Aber du wirst...
- Es ist jetzt 8:30...oder?
433
00:28:16,141 --> 00:28:20,475
Es...ist...es ist 9:30, ja.
434
00:28:20,545 --> 00:28:21,876
- Jetzt?
- Ja.
435
00:28:21,947 --> 00:28:24,108
- Ja.
- Es ist 9:30?
436
00:28:24,182 --> 00:28:25,581
- Ja.
- Ja. Fast.
437
00:28:25,650 --> 00:28:28,380
- Ich bin dran um...
- Es ist im Moment 27 nach 9:00.
438
00:28:28,453 --> 00:28:30,944
Oh mein Gott.
Wir sind eine Stunde zu sp<73>t.
439
00:28:31,023 --> 00:28:33,014
- Oh mein Gott. Danke.
- Gern geschehen.
440
00:28:33,091 --> 00:28:36,458
- Nun, wir m<>ssen -- wir fangen in 3 --
- Jedenfalls, sch<63>n sie kennenzulernen.
441
00:28:36,528 --> 00:28:38,462
Wissen sie,
dass er gerade dran ist?
442
00:28:38,530 --> 00:28:41,124
Ja - naja,
...haben sie erwartet.
443
00:28:41,199 --> 00:28:43,258
- Oh, Jesus. Okay.
- Okay, wir...
444
00:28:45,504 --> 00:28:48,667
Kommen sie auch?
Sind sie registriert?
445
00:28:49,674 --> 00:28:53,166
Ich bin sein Assistent.
Wir arbeiten beide mit ihm.
446
00:28:53,245 --> 00:28:55,736
Wir m<>ssen uns jetzt um eine Dinge
k<EFBFBD>mmern.
447
00:28:55,814 --> 00:28:57,543
- Hier ist es.
- Okay.
448
00:28:57,616 --> 00:29:00,608
- M<>chten Sie am Dinner teilnehmen?
- Ja, bitte.
449
00:29:00,685 --> 00:29:03,279
- Sind damit Kosten verbunden, oder...
- Nein, das ist inklusive.
450
00:29:03,355 --> 00:29:06,620
Okay. Ja, wir -- wir werden
am Dinner teilnehmen. Das ist toll.
451
00:29:07,526 --> 00:29:09,357
- Wow.
- Ich glaube, wir m<>ssen uns beeilen.
452
00:29:09,428 --> 00:29:12,022
- Ja. Ich werde dich begleiten.
- Ja. Bitte.
453
00:29:13,865 --> 00:29:15,696
Wobei, nein, Sie k<>nnen jetzt nicht
reingehen,
454
00:29:15,767 --> 00:29:18,099
weil Sie sich vorher noch darum
k<EFBFBD>mmern m<>ssen.
455
00:29:18,170 --> 00:29:21,662
Wir sind eine Stunde -
Wir sind eine Stunde zu sp<73>t.
456
00:29:21,740 --> 00:29:24,402
- Ich muss etwas erledigen.
- Ja.
457
00:29:24,476 --> 00:29:26,808
Er muss jetzt gleich einen sehr
wichtigen Anruf t<>tigen.
458
00:29:26,878 --> 00:29:28,709
- Ich brauche daf<61>r 5 Minuten.
- Jetzt gleich?
459
00:29:28,780 --> 00:29:29,838
Tut mir leid.
460
00:29:29,915 --> 00:29:32,748
Aber Sie m<>ssen Ihre Pr<50>sentation
in 2 Minuten beginne.
461
00:29:32,818 --> 00:29:35,309
Bitte sagen Sie ihm, dass ich
3 Minuten sp<73>ter komme.
462
00:29:41,093 --> 00:29:43,288
Nun, es gibt da noch ein Detail.
463
00:29:43,361 --> 00:29:46,524
Jesus. Fuck.
Wieso wussten wir das nicht?
464
00:29:46,598 --> 00:29:48,759
Keine Ahnung.
Das ist wirklich unglaublich.
465
00:29:49,801 --> 00:29:52,292
- Komm schon.
- Okay. Los gehts.
466
00:29:53,605 --> 00:29:55,766
Oh Mann, das ist schrecklich.
467
00:29:55,841 --> 00:29:58,105
Das ist das bl<62>deste -
Ich kann nicht...
468
00:29:59,211 --> 00:30:02,044
Das ist - ist eine Stunde Unterschied.
Hier ist eine andere Zeitzone.
469
00:30:04,950 --> 00:30:08,147
Das ist unglaublich.
Wie zur H<>lle kann das passieren?
470
00:30:08,220 --> 00:30:12,054
- Okay, so. Das ist erledigt.
- Meine Damen und Herren...
471
00:30:12,124 --> 00:30:14,524
Okay, schnell,
das Shirt - die Unterw<72>sche.
472
00:30:15,994 --> 00:30:17,256
Die goldene Unterw<72>sche.
473
00:30:17,329 --> 00:30:18,591
Okay...
474
00:30:19,998 --> 00:30:21,989
Muss ich da was durchstecken?
475
00:30:22,067 --> 00:30:23,728
- Nein.
- Okay.
476
00:30:23,802 --> 00:30:24,962
Brauchst du Hilfe?
477
00:30:26,838 --> 00:30:29,238
- H<>ngen deine Hoden raus?
- Aehm, ja..
478
00:30:31,209 --> 00:30:32,267
Okay.
479
00:30:32,344 --> 00:30:33,504
Los gehts.
480
00:30:34,779 --> 00:30:35,939
Okay. Gut.
481
00:30:37,916 --> 00:30:41,647
Oh Gott.
Okay...Gut.
482
00:30:41,720 --> 00:30:44,188
- Hier ist ein bisschen Luft drin.
- Okay, jetzt die Hosen.
483
00:30:44,789 --> 00:30:45,847
Beeil dich.
484
00:30:49,761 --> 00:30:53,094
Oh, Hi. Sch<63>n, Sie kennenzulernen.
Es tut mir so leid.
485
00:31:10,515 --> 00:31:13,348
Danke.
Es tut mir schrecklich leid -
486
00:31:15,787 --> 00:31:17,618
Ja, ich werde die Pr<50>sentation
halten.
487
00:31:19,457 --> 00:31:20,788
Tut mir schrecklich leid.
488
00:31:20,859 --> 00:31:24,727
Ich denke die Welthandelsorganistion sollte
<EFBFBD>ber Zeitzonen Bescheid wissen, aber...
489
00:31:26,431 --> 00:31:28,922
Jemand sagte,
"Ist dort nicht eine andere Zeitzone?"
490
00:31:29,000 --> 00:31:33,096
Und ich sagte, "Nein. Ganz Europa
hat die gleiche Zeitzone."
491
00:31:33,171 --> 00:31:36,004
- Und das hat uns alle <20>berzeugt.
- Mich auch.
492
00:31:36,074 --> 00:31:40,238
Wir waren <20>berzeugt, dass es die richtige
Zeit ist, und dann sind wir heute Morgen...
493
00:31:40,312 --> 00:31:43,440
5 oder 10 Minuten zu sp<73>t aufgewacht,
494
00:31:43,515 --> 00:31:47,474
und haben dann bemerkt, dass der Laptop
nicht funktioniert.
495
00:31:47,552 --> 00:31:49,952
Nein, vielleicht k<>nnen wir die
Reihenfolge <20>ndern.
496
00:31:50,021 --> 00:31:52,353
K<EFBFBD>nnen wir jemand anders vorziehen,
und ich bin sp<73>ter dran?
497
00:31:52,424 --> 00:31:54,153
Sie sagten, "Ich denke, das k<>nnen
wir machen."
498
00:31:54,226 --> 00:31:57,320
Sie haben dann die Kaffee-Leute
angerufen und mit ihnen gesprochen,
499
00:31:57,395 --> 00:31:58,953
um zu sehen, das mit dem Kaffee klappt.
500
00:31:59,030 --> 00:32:00,019
Das wars.
501
00:33:13,071 --> 00:33:14,538
Vielen Dank.
502
00:33:15,106 --> 00:33:16,368
Dieser hier...
503
00:33:17,642 --> 00:33:21,373
Es ist mir eine Ehre, hier in Tampere
sein zu k<>nnen, und vor Ihnen zu reden,
504
00:33:21,446 --> 00:33:25,177
den herausragendsten Textilarbeitern
der Welt.
505
00:33:26,117 --> 00:33:30,451
Ich sehe hier in allen Gesichtern einen
ergreifenden, kindlichen Eifer,
506
00:33:30,522 --> 00:33:34,390
die gr<67>ssten Textil-Fragen der Welt
in Angriff zu nehmen.
507
00:33:34,459 --> 00:33:36,791
Wie passt die WTO da hinein?
508
00:33:36,861 --> 00:33:41,355
Was wir bei von WTO machen wollen,
ist Ihnen zu helfen, ihre Profitziele
zu erreichen.
509
00:33:41,433 --> 00:33:43,697
Und in nur 20 Minuten von jetzt an
510
00:33:43,768 --> 00:33:48,000
werde ich Ihnen die L<>sungen der WTO
511
00:33:48,073 --> 00:33:51,804
zu zwei der gr<67><72>ten Managementprobleme
vorstellen.
512
00:33:51,876 --> 00:33:55,107
Erstens - in Verbindung mit entfernt
arbeitender Belegschaft bleiben,
513
00:33:55,180 --> 00:33:59,014
und zweitens - gesunde Mengen an
freier Zeit behaupten k<>nnen.
514
00:33:59,084 --> 00:34:03,282
Die L<>sung basiert - grob gesagt -
auf Textilien.
515
00:34:05,824 --> 00:34:09,191
Aber wie kam es eigentlich dazu,
dass Arbeiter zu einem Problem wurden?
516
00:34:10,362 --> 00:34:12,227
Bevor ich unsere L<>sung vorstelle,
517
00:34:12,297 --> 00:34:17,291
M<EFBFBD>chte ich noch ein bisschen <20>ber die Geschichte
des Mitarbeiter-Verwaltungs-Problems sprechen.
518
00:34:17,369 --> 00:34:21,032
Wir kennen alle den Amerikanischen
B<EFBFBD>rgerkrieg - jedenfalls in den U.S.A.
519
00:34:21,106 --> 00:34:25,270
Es war der blutigste, unprofitabelste
Krieg in der Geschichte unseres Landes.
520
00:34:25,343 --> 00:34:27,709
Ein Krieg, in dem unglaublich
riesige Mengen Geldes
521
00:34:27,779 --> 00:34:30,942
aus dem Fenster geworfen wurden -
und das alles f<>r Textilien.
522
00:34:31,015 --> 00:34:35,952
In den 1860ern ertrank der S<>den
f<EFBFBD>rmlich in Geld.
523
00:34:36,020 --> 00:34:38,511
Er hatte gerade den "cotton
gin" erfunden,
524
00:34:38,590 --> 00:34:41,058
einer Maschine zur Entk<74>rnung
von Baumwolle.
525
00:34:41,126 --> 00:34:44,095
die den S<>den aus seiner pr<70>-
industriellen Vergangenheit holte.
526
00:34:44,162 --> 00:34:45,823
Hunderttausende von Arbeitern,
527
00:34:45,897 --> 00:34:48,331
die vorher in ihren Herkunftsl<73>ndern
arbeitslos waren,
528
00:34:48,400 --> 00:34:50,391
bekamen n<>tzliche Jobs in der
Textilbranche.
529
00:34:51,169 --> 00:34:55,162
Und in dieses rosige Bild von Freiheit
und Wachstum trat - Sie ahnen es -
530
00:34:55,240 --> 00:34:57,231
die Nord-Staaten.
531
00:34:57,308 --> 00:35:01,301
Nun, einige Br<42>gerkriegsbef<65>rworter sagen,
dass der Krieg, trotz all seiner Fehler,
532
00:35:01,379 --> 00:35:03,609
wenigstens zur Folge hatte, dass
533
00:35:03,681 --> 00:35:06,616
Formen von unfreiwilligem Import von
Arbeitskr<EFBFBD>ften verboten wurden.
534
00:35:06,684 --> 00:35:09,278
Diese Formen sind nat<61>rlich auch
eine schreckliche Sache.
535
00:35:09,354 --> 00:35:11,345
Ich pers<72>nlich bin ein
Sklavereigegner.
536
00:35:11,423 --> 00:35:15,757
Allerdings gibt es keinen Zweifel daran, dass
der Markt auch ohne diesen Eingriff,
537
00:35:15,827 --> 00:35:20,423
letztendlich sauberere Formen von Arbeit
hervorgebracht h<>tte.
538
00:35:21,065 --> 00:35:23,363
Um meinen Standpunkt zu beweisen,
folgen Sie mir bitte in ein,
539
00:35:23,435 --> 00:35:26,768
wie Albert Einstein es nannte,
Gedankenexperiment.
540
00:35:27,672 --> 00:35:32,006
Gehen wir davon aus, dass die unfreiwillige Einfuhr
von Arbeitskr<6B>ften nie verboten worden w<>re.
541
00:35:32,076 --> 00:35:35,671
Sklaven w<>rden immer noch existieren,
und es w<>re einfach, welche zu besitzen.
542
00:35:35,747 --> 00:35:39,581
Was glauben Sie, w<>rde es heute kosten,
einen Skaven profitabel zu unterhalten,
543
00:35:39,651 --> 00:35:41,642
sagen wir, hier in Tampere?
544
00:35:41,719 --> 00:35:47,123
Schaun wir mal ... ein einfaches
Kleidungsset kostet mindestens 50$.
545
00:35:47,192 --> 00:35:50,923
Zwei Mahlzeiten bei McDonald's
kosten ungef<65>hr 10$.
546
00:35:50,995 --> 00:35:54,988
Der billigste und kleinste Raum
kostet ungef<65>hr 250$ im Monat.
547
00:35:55,066 --> 00:35:58,001
Damit er gut funktioniert, m<>ssen Sie
f<EFBFBD>r die medizinische Versorgung des
Sklaven sorgen.
548
00:35:58,069 --> 00:36:02,130
Wenn sein Herkunftsland z.B. verschmutzt
ist, dann kann das teuer werden.
549
00:36:02,207 --> 00:36:05,199
Und nat<61>rlich ist mit den Kinderarbeits-
gesetzen hier in Finnland
550
00:36:05,276 --> 00:36:08,109
der Gro<72>teil des Jugendmarktes einfach
nicht verf<72>gbar.
551
00:36:09,214 --> 00:36:13,150
Nun lassen Sie den selben Sklaven zu
Hause. Sagen wir in Gabun.
552
00:36:13,218 --> 00:36:17,086
In Gabun kostet Nahrung f<>r 2 Wochen
ungef<EFBFBD>hr 10$.
553
00:36:17,155 --> 00:36:22,218
F<EFBFBD>r $250 bekommt man Wohnraum f<>r
2 Jahre, nicht f<>r einen Monat.
554
00:36:22,293 --> 00:36:25,956
F<EFBFBD>r 50$ bekommen Sie preiswerte
Kleidung f<>r ein ganzes Leben.
555
00:36:26,030 --> 00:36:27,964
Und die medizinische Versorgung ist
nat<EFBFBD>rlich auch preiswerter.
556
00:36:28,032 --> 00:36:32,867
Hinzu kommt, dass die Jugend ohne
Einschr<EFBFBD>nkung besch<63>ftigt werden kann.
557
00:36:32,937 --> 00:36:35,428
Der gr<67><72>te Vorteil ausgelagerter
Arbeitskr<EFBFBD>fte,
558
00:36:35,507 --> 00:36:37,668
entsteht allerdings f<>r den Sklaven,
559
00:36:37,742 --> 00:36:42,008
denn in Gabun gibt es keine Notwendigkeit,
den Sklaven in Unfreiheit zu halten.
560
00:36:42,080 --> 00:36:43,479
Das liegt vor allem daran,
561
00:36:43,548 --> 00:36:46,483
dass es keine einmaligen Sklaventransport-Kosten
gibt, die wieder erwirtschaftet werden m<>ssen,
562
00:36:46,551 --> 00:36:48,542
und so werden die etwaigen finanziellen
Verluste durch Flucht
563
00:36:48,620 --> 00:36:51,919
auf die Kosten einer rudiment<6E>ren Ausbildung
des Sklaven begrenzt.
564
00:36:51,990 --> 00:36:54,049
Da der Sklave frei sein kann,
565
00:36:54,125 --> 00:36:57,617
wird er pl<70>tzlich zum Arbeiter,
anstatt Sklave zu sein.
566
00:36:57,695 --> 00:37:01,290
Auch ist es sehr gut f<>r die Moral,
dass die Sklaven - Arbeiter -
567
00:37:01,366 --> 00:37:03,766
den Luxus haben, in ihrem ur-
spr<EFBFBD>nglichen Lebensraum zu bleiben,
568
00:37:03,835 --> 00:37:06,702
und nicht an Orte umziehen
m<EFBFBD>ssen, an denen sie Opfer
569
00:37:06,771 --> 00:37:10,263
von Unannehmlichkeiten wie Heimweh
oder Rassismus werden w<>rden.
570
00:37:11,009 --> 00:37:14,172
Ich denke, durch unser kleines
Gedanken-Experiment wird klar,
571
00:37:14,245 --> 00:37:17,737
dass Norden und S<>den es einfach den
Markt h<>tten <20>berlassen sollen.
572
00:37:17,815 --> 00:37:19,612
ohne protektionistische Eingriffe
573
00:37:19,684 --> 00:37:23,745
w<EFBFBD>re die Sklaverei auch von allein durch
effizientere Methoden ersetzt worden.
574
00:37:23,821 --> 00:37:25,152
Durch den aufgebauten Handlungsdruck,
575
00:37:25,223 --> 00:37:29,159
hat der Norden nicht nur die Freiheit des
S<EFBFBD>dens in grausamer Weise verletzt,
576
00:37:29,227 --> 00:37:31,161
sondern auch die Sklaverei
577
00:37:31,229 --> 00:37:34,426
ihrer nat<61>rlichen Entwicklung hin zu
ausgelagerter Arbeit beraubt.
578
00:37:35,833 --> 00:37:38,324
H<EFBFBD>tten die F<>hrer der Vereinigten
Staaten der 1860er
579
00:37:38,403 --> 00:37:40,963
verstanden, was unsere F<>hrer heute
verstehen,
580
00:37:41,039 --> 00:37:43,303
dann w<>re der B<>rgerkrieg nie
passiert.
581
00:37:44,142 --> 00:37:47,009
In einer Welt, in der das Hauptquartier
einer Firma in New York sitzen k<>nnte,
582
00:37:47,078 --> 00:37:49,342
oder Hong Kong, oder Espoo in Finland,
583
00:37:49,414 --> 00:37:53,578
und die Arbeiter sind in Gabun,
Rangun oder Estland,
584
00:37:53,651 --> 00:37:56,984
wie beh<65>lt ein Manager eine
Verbindung mit den Arbeitern,
585
00:37:57,055 --> 00:37:59,216
und wie kann er <20>ber die Distanz
sicherstellen,
586
00:37:59,290 --> 00:38:02,350
dass die Arbeiter ihre Arbeit
erst nehmen?
587
00:38:03,094 --> 00:38:05,790
Ich zeige Ihnen jetzt einen
echten Prototypen
588
00:38:05,863 --> 00:38:10,323
der L<>sung der WTO f<>r zwei wichtige
aktuelle Managementprobleme.
589
00:38:10,401 --> 00:38:13,234
Nun wissen wir alle, dass nicht mal
der optimal entworfene Arbeitsplatz
590
00:38:13,304 --> 00:38:16,967
dem wachesten Manager helfen kann, die
Arbeiter wirklich im Auge zu behalten.
591
00:38:17,041 --> 00:38:22,308
Was sie brauchen, ist eine L<>sung, die eine
totale Verbindung mit den Arbeitern erm<72>glicht,
592
00:38:22,380 --> 00:38:24,871
besonders dann, wenn sie weit entfernt
sind.
593
00:38:26,084 --> 00:38:28,245
Mike, kannst Du mir einen Moment helfen?
594
00:38:50,775 --> 00:38:52,106
Danke.
595
00:38:52,176 --> 00:38:54,906
Das ist viel besser.
Wesentlich bequemer.
596
00:38:56,414 --> 00:39:00,578
Dies ist die Antwort der WTO auf
zwei der wichtigsten Management-
probleme,
597
00:39:00,652 --> 00:39:03,712
und wir nennen es den Management-
Entspannungs-Anzug.
598
00:39:03,788 --> 00:39:06,120
Es sind wieder die beiden Probleme -
599
00:39:06,190 --> 00:39:09,023
wie man enge Verbindung mit den
entfernten Arbeitern h<>lt,
600
00:39:09,093 --> 00:39:13,928
und wie man die Gem<65>tlichkeit bewahrt
und die entspannenden Aktivit<69>ten versch<63>nert.
601
00:39:13,998 --> 00:39:16,831
Wie funktioniert
der Management-Entspannungs-Anzug?
602
00:39:16,901 --> 00:39:20,064
Ich versichere ihnen,
dass er au<61>ergew<65>hnlich bequem ist.
603
00:39:20,138 --> 00:39:23,904
Nun ja, lassen sie mich seine wichtigsten
Austattungsmerkmale erl<72>utern.
604
00:39:49,033 --> 00:39:50,625
Dies ...
605
00:39:50,702 --> 00:39:54,103
Dies ist das A.V.A. --
606
00:39:54,172 --> 00:39:58,040
das Mitarbeiter-Visualisierungs-Anh<6E>ngsel.
607
00:39:58,109 --> 00:40:01,476
Es ist ein sofort einsetzbares
H<EFBFBD>ft-montiertes Ger<65>t
608
00:40:01,546 --> 00:40:04,606
komplett freih<69>ndig steuerbar ...
609
00:40:04,682 --> 00:40:09,016
das dem Manager gestattet,
seine Mitarbeiter <20>berall zu beobachten.
610
00:40:09,087 --> 00:40:13,490
Informationen <20>ber den genauen Umfang
und die Qualit<69>t der k<>rperlichen Arbeit
611
00:40:13,558 --> 00:40:15,651
werden <20>bertragen
und sind nicht nur einfach sichtbar,
612
00:40:15,727 --> 00:40:21,359
sondern werden durch elektrische Leitungen
direkt in den Manager hineingeschickt.
613
00:40:21,432 --> 00:40:25,766
Die Arbeiter sind daf<61>r mit
einem passenden Sende-Chip ausgestattet
614
00:40:25,837 --> 00:40:29,637
die direkt in ihre Schulter
implantiert wurden.
615
00:40:29,707 --> 00:40:32,699
Die andere - und ebenso n<>tzliche - Errungenschaft
des Management-Entspannungs-Anzugs (MEA)
616
00:40:32,777 --> 00:40:34,438
hat etwas mit der Entspannung zu tun.
617
00:40:34,512 --> 00:40:38,312
In den USA hat sich die Entspannung
(ein Synonym f<>r Freiheit)
618
00:40:38,382 --> 00:40:42,284
seit den 70er Jahren
kontinuierlich verringert.
619
00:40:42,353 --> 00:40:45,948
Der Management-Entspannungs-Anzug
gestattet dem Manager diesen Trend umzukehren
620
00:40:46,023 --> 00:40:48,321
indem er seine Arbeit <20>berall machen kann
621
00:40:48,392 --> 00:40:51,486
und trotzdem den direkten Kontakt
zu seinen Mitarbeitern bewahrt,
622
00:40:51,562 --> 00:40:55,225
und k<>rperlich wahrnimmt was seine
Arbeitskr<EFBFBD>fte tun.
623
00:40:55,299 --> 00:40:58,234
Dies wird durch Elektroden erm<72>glicht,
die direkt in den Manager implantiert sind.
624
00:40:58,302 --> 00:41:01,135
Der Manager sieht
also die Mitarbeiter,
625
00:41:01,205 --> 00:41:03,366
und f<>hlt au<61>erdem, was sie f<>hlen.
626
00:41:03,441 --> 00:41:07,775
und er kann w<>hlen, auf welchen
Arbeitsplatz er sich fokussieren m<>chte.
627
00:41:08,679 --> 00:41:11,011
Zusammenfassend
628
00:41:11,082 --> 00:41:14,745
m<EFBFBD>chte ich also fragen:
Ist dies ein Science-Fiction-Szenario?
629
00:41:20,424 --> 00:41:21,914
Die Antwort ist: nein.
630
00:41:22,927 --> 00:41:25,452
Alles was wir hier gesehen haben,
alles wor<6F>ber wir gesprochen haben.
631
00:41:25,530 --> 00:41:27,020
Ist bereits heute m<>glich.
632
00:41:27,832 --> 00:41:31,233
Wir k<>nnen den Blick auf die Zukunft richten
auf den rasenden Fortschritt
633
00:41:31,302 --> 00:41:33,361
zu neuen Horizonten
634
00:41:33,437 --> 00:41:37,703
gef<EFBFBD>llt mit Kooperation und wechselseitigem Vergn<67>gen
im Namen des Wohlstands.
635
00:41:37,775 --> 00:41:40,835
Ich bin sehr erfreut, hier zu sein.
Vielen Dank.
####### Text in Bild #######
635
00:41:53,500 --> 00:41:55,000
Vielen Danke, Herr Unruh
00:41:54,600 --> 00:41:57,300
f<EFBFBD>r diese sehr interessante Pr<50>sentation.
635
00:41:57,500 --> 00:41:59,500
Ich denke,
635
00:41:59,600 --> 00:42:00,500
dies ist die erste
635
00:42:00,700 --> 00:42:03,200
Pr<EFBFBD>sentation seitens der WTO
635
00:42:03,500 --> 00:42:05,500
mit einer praktischen Vorf<72>hrung,
die ich erleben durfte.
########### stop here ########
636
00:42:07,304 --> 00:42:10,098
Das ist etwas, das wir in Zukunft h<>ufiger
tun wollen ...
#### neu ####
636
00:42:10,500 --> 00:42:12,500
Einen Moment bitte, Herr Unruh ...
636
00:42:12,500 --> 00:42:14,300
Gibt es Fragen
636
00:42:14,500 --> 00:42:16,300
zu den Vortr<74>gen,
636
00:42:16,500 --> 00:42:18,300
die an diesem Vormittag gehalten wurden?
636
00:42:18,500 --> 00:42:22,000
Sie k<>nnen Fragen zu allen Reden stellen,
die bisher gehalten wurden.
#### neu stop ####
637
00:42:31,061 --> 00:42:32,620
Ich war nicht schockiert von
der Reaktionslosigkeit der Leute,
638
00:42:32,697 --> 00:42:36,098
Ich war nicht schockiert,
dass die Leute alles fraglos hinnahmen
639
00:42:36,167 --> 00:42:40,661
weil ich dachte: "Nun ja, das zeigt nur
dass wir mehr Kontrolle brauchen".
640
00:42:40,738 --> 00:42:44,071
Weil die WTO (also ich)
daherkommen kann
641
00:42:44,141 --> 00:42:48,407
und solch abscheuliche Dinge
dieser Gruppe von hochgebildeten Leuten,
642
00:42:48,479 --> 00:42:52,210
also der 0.1%-Bildungselite
der Welt
643
00:42:52,283 --> 00:42:54,148
in einem fortschrittlichen Land
wie Finnland.
644
00:42:54,218 --> 00:42:56,686
All diese Leute haben
mindestens einen Doktortitel,
645
00:42:56,754 --> 00:42:58,745
aber du kannst ihnen die
furchtbarsten Dinge erz<72>hlen
646
00:42:58,823 --> 00:43:02,315
und niemand widerspricht
und niemanden k<>mmert es.
647
00:43:02,393 --> 00:43:06,921
Es stellt sich die Frage: gibt es etwas,
mit dem Konzerne nicht durchkommen k<>nnten?
648
00:43:19,310 --> 00:43:20,641
Wo sind wir also gerade?
649
00:43:20,711 --> 00:43:23,305
Nun ja, wir kommen gerade
in Helsinki an.
650
00:43:24,482 --> 00:43:26,416
Wir haben die Konferenz morgens verlassen.
651
00:43:26,484 --> 00:43:31,478
Nach dem Abendessen wurden wir fast
verr<EFBFBD>ckt - wir mussten einfach gehen.
652
00:43:31,555 --> 00:43:33,955
Ich denke, der Abendessen hat uns
wirklich den Rest gegeben.
653
00:43:34,025 --> 00:43:36,084
Ich musste sogar vorzeitig
das Abendessen verlassen.
654
00:43:36,160 --> 00:43:40,494
Ich ging hin<69>ber zu dem Tisch, an dem Unruh --
655
00:43:40,564 --> 00:43:44,694
Hank Hardy mit den
hohen Tieren sitzen musste.
656
00:43:44,769 --> 00:43:47,101
und ich sagte ihm,
dass wir vorzeitig gehen m<>ssten,
657
00:43:47,171 --> 00:43:51,835
Weil wir jetzt eine Telefon-Konferenz
mit Mobutu Oblongatu h<>tten.
658
00:43:53,878 --> 00:43:55,209
- Gro<72>artig.
- Hallo.
659
00:43:55,279 --> 00:43:56,610
Tut mir leid, mich einzumischen,
660
00:43:56,681 --> 00:43:59,013
aber wir sind mit
Manduka Djubango verabredet ...
661
00:43:59,083 --> 00:44:00,812
- Oh, mein Gott.
- ... um 10.00.
662
00:44:00,885 --> 00:44:02,716
Dann fingen wir beide an zu lachen,
663
00:44:02,787 --> 00:44:05,984
was angesichts des Gespr<70>chsinhalts
nicht wirklich angemessen wahr.
664
00:44:06,057 --> 00:44:10,016
Also sind wir gegangen,
und wir kamen zu dem Schluss,
665
00:44:10,094 --> 00:44:14,497
dass uns nichts mehr einfiel, was
wir noch auf dieser Konferenz tun k<>nnten,
666
00:44:14,565 --> 00:44:18,228
Also dachten wir uns einfach:
"Lasst uns stattdessen nach Helsinki gehen".
667
00:44:19,403 --> 00:44:20,665
Dies ist also die Zeitung.
668
00:44:20,738 --> 00:44:23,070
Auf der Titelseite --
Habe ich entdeckt --
669
00:44:23,140 --> 00:44:26,473
dass ein Seminar
an der Universit<69>t gegeben wurde
670
00:44:26,544 --> 00:44:30,878
in dem jemand dar<61>ber gesprochen hat,
wie sich entfernte Arbeiter
671
00:44:30,948 --> 00:44:34,111
mit elektrischen Impulsen steuern lassen.
672
00:44:34,185 --> 00:44:37,018
Dann bl<62>tterst du weiter und ...
673
00:44:38,356 --> 00:44:39,846
... und das findest du dann.
674
00:44:39,924 --> 00:44:45,794
Und das repr<70>sentiert
die Welthandelsorganisation.
675
00:44:45,863 --> 00:44:50,891
Das ... <i>ist</i>
die Welthandelsorganisation.
676
00:44:55,106 --> 00:44:59,600
Ich fuhr mitte der 80er Jahre runter
zu diesen mexikanischen Grenzst<73>dten.
677
00:44:59,677 --> 00:45:01,508
Sie wurden "Maquilladoras" genannt
678
00:45:01,579 --> 00:45:04,173
als die ersten Handelsabkommen
679
00:45:04,248 --> 00:45:06,944
zwischen Mexiko und den USA
in Kraft traten.
680
00:45:07,018 --> 00:45:10,283
Und alle waren der Meinung "Dies wird
Mexiko von der Armut befreien",
681
00:45:10,354 --> 00:45:12,845
und alles wird innerhalb der
n<EFBFBD>chsten zehn Jahre so gut laufen,
682
00:45:12,923 --> 00:45:15,517
dass alle Mexikaner mit sch<63>nen
neuen Autos umherfahren werden.
683
00:45:15,593 --> 00:45:18,528
Also ich fuhr hinunter und sah --
684
00:45:18,596 --> 00:45:22,430
die unglaubliche Armut
in diesen mexikanischen Grenzst<73>dten.
685
00:45:22,500 --> 00:45:26,402
F<EFBFBD>nfzehn Jahre sp<73>ter fuhr ich erneut dorthin.
Und kein bisschen hatte sich ge<67>ndert.
686
00:45:26,470 --> 00:45:29,928
Hier siehst du all diese Arbeiter
die f<>r alle m<>glichen US-Konzerne arbeiten,
687
00:45:30,007 --> 00:45:32,532
und dann gehst du auf die andere Stra<72>enseite
688
00:45:32,610 --> 00:45:35,704
und du siehst Leute, die in
den gleichen gr<67><72>lichen Bedingungen leben,
689
00:45:35,780 --> 00:45:37,771
die Armut ist geblieben.
690
00:45:37,848 --> 00:45:41,579
Und du musst dich fragen:
"Wem hat es gen<65>tzt?"
691
00:45:41,652 --> 00:45:44,143
Den US-Konzernen hat es gen<65>tzt.
692
00:45:44,221 --> 00:45:46,712
W<EFBFBD>hrend der 80er Jahre
wurden sie sogar noch reicher,
693
00:45:46,791 --> 00:45:49,954
Sie meldeten Rekord-Gewinne --
immer h<>here Gewinne,
694
00:45:50,027 --> 00:45:52,757
und die Leute in Mexiko
leiden weiterhin.
695
00:45:52,830 --> 00:45:55,390
Es war ein einziger gro<72>er Betrug.
696
00:46:12,550 --> 00:46:13,949
Ist das der Richtige?
697
00:46:14,018 --> 00:46:17,419
Nein - das ist der Falsche.
698
00:46:17,488 --> 00:46:18,648
Scheisse.
699
00:46:19,690 --> 00:46:21,681
[TODO] "Wird die WTO dazu Stellung nehmen?"
700
00:46:21,759 --> 00:46:24,751
Oh mein Gott. Da sind Bilder.
Sch<EFBFBD>ne Bilder.
701
00:46:24,829 --> 00:46:26,820
Ja, bei dieser Gr<47><72>e sehen sie
sogar gut aus.
702
00:46:26,897 --> 00:46:30,560
"Bichlbaum ist nicht ...
Aber im Fernsehen tut er so, als ob."
703
00:46:30,634 --> 00:46:33,034
Das ist grunds<64>tzlich der Kern dessen,
was wir tun.
704
00:46:33,104 --> 00:46:36,801
All diese Zeitungen und Zeitschriften
habe Artikel
705
00:46:36,874 --> 00:46:38,603
<EFBFBD>ber die Yes-Men,
706
00:46:38,676 --> 00:46:42,168
daf<EFBFBD>r tun wir diese Dinge.
707
00:46:42,246 --> 00:46:44,237
Deshalb gehen wir zu diesen Konferenzen.
708
00:46:44,315 --> 00:46:46,647
Es geht nicht um diese hundert oder
zweihundert Leute
709
00:46:46,717 --> 00:46:48,878
die beim Vortrag dabei sind.
710
00:46:48,953 --> 00:46:50,784
Wobei wir uns nat<61>rlich freuen,
711
00:46:50,855 --> 00:46:53,517
wenn sie den Vortrag mit
interessanten Eindr<64>cken verlassen.
712
00:46:53,591 --> 00:46:57,994
Der Grund, warum wir das machen, ist,
dass die leute, die <i>bizarre</i> Zeitschriften
713
00:46:58,062 --> 00:47:00,860